Mouth Rinse

In stock
SKU
8040

New Santegra® oral care product “Mouth Rinse”

• Helps to remove food particles and bacteria;
• Helps to prevent plaque build-up;
• Freshens breath;
• Does not contain triclosan;
• Does not contain alcohol;
• Provides mild care, suitable for sensitive teeth and gums.

We are aware of the importance of daily tooth brushing and regular visits to the dentist since childhood. But oral health is more important than you might realize. It has been proven that oral health affects your overall health and wellbeing. If you don't take proper care of your teeth and gums, you could raise the risk of serious illnesses, such as heart disease, diabetes, respiratory infections, and even dementia.

Dentists recommend you floss and brush your teeth at least twice a day, and also include mouth rinse in your daily routine.

The most common cause of gum and teeth disease are pathogen bacteria in the oral cavity. These bacteria can also cause bad breath, that is not only unpleasant, but can be really embarrassing when you communicate with other people.

Mouth rinse with antimicrobial properties help fight bacteria and stop bacterial growth. Using mouth rinse and swishing vigorously after a meal helps eliminate food particles and reduce acidity in your mouth, that is damaging to your teeth enamel. It also helps prevent plaque build-up, provides gentle gum massage, improving blood circulation, and also freshens your breath.

Santegra® introduces a new oral care product – MOUTH RINSE. The key ingredient of this product is Sodium Chlorite - stabilized Chlorine Dioxide. Sodium Chlorite has antimicrobial properties.

Chlorine dioxide when stabilized in water and used at low concentrations effectively neutralizes the cause of bad breath - volatile sulfur compounds in the oral cavity.
It also destroys the anaerobic bacteria that cause gum disease and bad breath.
A number of studies have shown that Sodium Chlorite used in mouthwash is effective in reducing plaque, tongue coating accumulation and the counts of anaerobic bacteria.

Mouth Rinse is a mild oral care product, it does not contain triclosan, or alcohol. It is suitable for sensitive teeth and gums, and does not cause discomfort or burning sensation. It has a pleasant taste due to a natural peppermint flavor.

Santegra® MOUTH RINSE – for brilliant smile and self-confidence.

Water (Aqua), Sodium Chorite (Stabilized Chlorine Dioxide), Flavor (Natural Mint Flavor).

Made in the EU

Use 20 ml of Mouth Rinse twice daily after brushing and flossing your teeth, and as needed during the day. Swish vigorously for 30 seconds, then spit out. Do not swallow.


For best results, do not eat or drink for at least 10 minutes after rinsing.

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1. Shuichi Tsubura, Kimio Uchiyama, Manabu Yamada, Osamu Mimori, Shigeru Hiyama, Katsuma Katoh, Masaki Shibata. The Effect of Mouth Rinsing with Stabilized Chlorine Dioxide on Periodontitis. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2015, pp 20-24. http://pubs.sciepub.com/oral/3/1/5

ABSTRACT

MATATACOROTM (containing 10 mg/l stabilized chlorine dioxide: MA-T, no alcohol, and is an odorless antibacterial agent) is useful for sterilization and disinfection. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MA-T is an appropriate mouth rinse for patients undergoing initial periodontal treatment. The effect of rinsing with MA-T was compared with that with ConcoolTM (containing 0.05% chlorhexidine gluconate: CX), Neosterine GreenTM (containing 0.02% benzethonium chloride: NG), and purified water (PW).


MA-T rinsing resulted in a marked change in the BANA-score and in the VAS scale. The mean BANA scores (score ± SD) on day 0 and day 30 were 1.55±0.50 and 0.4±0.50 (p These results suggest that MA-T induced marked reduction of periodontopathic oral bacteria and increased feeling of freshness after the treatment period. These results suggest that MA-T is an appropriate mouth rinse for patient with periodontitis.

Conclusions
MA-T is an effective oral mouth rinse for patients with periodontitis. MA-T mouth rinsing could be useful for the treatment of inflammation and the clinical symptoms of periodontitis. The mechanism underlying the antibacterial effect of the MA-T mouth rinse is proposed to involve the inhibition of proteases that originate from oral bacteria. Furthermore, MA-T mouth rinse may contribute to human health care with respect to not only oral diseases, but also the control of host immunological responses.


2. Kayoko Shinada, Masayuki Ueno, Chisato Konishi, Sachiko Takehara, Sayaka Yokoyama, Takashi Zaitsu, Mari Ohnuki, Fredrick Allan Clive Wright and Yoko Kawaguchi; Effects of a mouthwash with chlorine dioxide on oral malodor and salivary bacteria: a randomized placebo-controlled 7-day trial. Trials. 2010 Feb 12;11:14. doi: 10.1186/1745-6215-11-14.

ABSTRACT

Background
Previous research has shown the oxidizing properties and microbiological efficacies of chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Its clinical efficacies on oral malodor have been evaluated and reported only in short duration trials, moreover, no clinical studies have investigated its microbiological efficacies on periodontal and malodorous bacteria. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the inhibitory effects of a mouthwash containing ClO2 used for 7 days on morning oral malodor and on salivary periodontal and malodorous bacteria.

Methods/Design
A randomized, double blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 15 healthy male volunteers, who were divided into 2 groups. Subjects were instructed to rinse with the experimental mouthwash containing ClO2 or the placebo mouthwash, without ClO2, twice per day for 7 days. After a one week washout period, each group then used the opposite mouthwash for 7 days. At baseline and after 7 days, oral malodor was evaluated with Organoleptic measurement (OM), and analyzed the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH) and dimethyl sulfide ((CH3)2S), the main VSCs of human oral malodor, were assessed by gas chromatography (GC). Clinical outcome variables included plaque and gingival indices, and tongue coating index. The samples of saliva were microbiologically investigated. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed using the polymerase chain reaction-Invader method.

Results and Discussion
The baseline oral condition in healthy subjects in the 2 groups did not differ significantly. After rinsing with the mouthwash containing ClO2 for 7 days, morning bad breath decreased as measured by the OM and reduced the concentrations of H2S, CH3SH and (CH3)2S measured by GC, were found. Moreover ClO2 mouthwash used over a 7-day period appeared effective in reducing plaque, tongue coating accumulation and the counts of Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva. Future research is needed to examine long-term effects, as well as effects on periodontal diseases and plaque accumulation in a well-defined sample of halitosis patients and broader population samples.

3. Frascella J1, Gilbert RD, Fernandez P, Hendler J. Effects of a mouthwash with chlorine dioxide on oral malodor and salivary bacteria: Compend Contin Educ Dent. 2000 Mar;21(3):241-4, 246, 248 passim; quiz 256.

ABSTRACT

Studies have suggested that when chlorine dioxide is contained in a mouthrinse, it neutralizes volatile sulfur compounds in mouth air. The efficacy of a chlorine dioxide-containing mouthrinse in the reduction of oral malodor was evaluated in a randomized, controlled, double-blind, parallel group study of 31 men and women. Subjects with a maximum odor pleasantness score of < or = -1 (slightly unpleasant/stale) on a 7-point ordinal scale at both screening and baseline were randomized to treatment with the chlorine dioxide-containing rinse (n = 16) or distilled water (negative control) (n = 15). Oral malodor was evaluated at baseline (prerinse) and at 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours postrinse by both a trained, previously calibrated panel of organoleptic judges and a factory-calibrated portable sulfide monitor. The sulfide monitor measured concentrations of volatile sulfur compounds in the subjects' mouth air 3 minutes after completion of the organoleptic assessment at each time point. The correlation between the organoleptic assessments and log-transformed sulfide monitor values was evaluated. With the chlorine dioxide mouthrinse, a statistically significant improvement in odor pleasantness, reduction in odor intensity, and reduction in oral volatile sulfur compound concentrations compared to the water control were evident at 2 hours postrinse and persisted through 8 hours postrinse. The mean (+/- SD) odor pleasantness improved from -1.25 +/- 0.31 at baseline to -0.73 +/- 0.33 at 2 hours postrinse in the chlorine dioxide group compared to -1.40 +/- 0.38 at baseline to -1.31 +/- 0.67 at 2 hours in the control group (P < 0.01). Odor pleasantness reached its maximum change from baseline to 0.63 +/- 0.45 at 8 hours postrinse. The mean (+/- SD) log-transformed sulfide monitor measurement decreased from 5.40 +/- 0.29 at baseline to 5.17 +/- 0.13 at 2 hours postrinse in the chlorine dioxide group, but increased from 5.47 +/- 0.40 at baseline to 5.56 +/- 0.54 at 2 hours in the control group (P < 0.01). As measured by the sulfide monitor, the mean volatile sulfur compound concentration in the chlorine dioxide group reached its minimum level at 8 hours postrinse (change from baseline in the log-transformed Halimeter measurement of -0.35 +/- 0.31). Thus, this study demonstrates that a one-time use of a chlorine dioxide-containing mouthrinse significantly improves mouth odor pleasantness, reduces mouth odor intensity, and reduces volatile sulfur compound concentrations in mouth air for at least 8 hours after use.

4. Yeturu SK1, Acharya S2, Urala AS3, Pentapati KC4. Effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis: A randomized controlled trial. J Oral Biol Craniofac Res. 2016 Jan-Apr;6(1):54-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jobcr.2015.08.008. Epub 2015 Sep 11

ABSTRACT

Objective:
To evaluate the effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis in orthodontic treatment.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:
A randomized single-center, single-blind, parallel group, controlled trial was conducted among 90 subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. The subjects were randomly divided into one of the three study groups (Aloe vera, chlorhexidine, chlorine dioxide). Plaque and gingivitis were assessed using modified Silness and Loe Plaque Index and Gingival Index at baseline and at follow-up after 15 days. Paired t-test and ANOVA with post hoc Dunnett test were used. A p-value of Results:

A total of 85 participants completed the study; among them, 40 were male and 45 were female. There was significant reduction in mean plaque and gingival scores in all the 3 groups at follow-up when compared to baseline. A significantly higher reduction (plaque and gingival scores) was found in chlorhexidine when compared with the Aloe vera group. However, no significant difference was seen between chlorhexidine and chlorine dioxide with respect to mean reduction in plaque and gingival scores.

Conclusion:
Chlorine dioxide can be a suitable and economical alternative for chlorhexidine. Further long-term studies are recommended for evaluating their effectiveness.

5. Kim JS1, Park JW, Kim DJ, Kim YK, Lee JY. Direct effect of chlorine dioxide, zinc chloride and chlorhexidine solution on the gaseous volatile sulfur compounds. Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):645-50. doi: 10.3109/00016357. 2014. 887770.

ABSTRACT

Objective:
This study focused on the ability of aqueous anti-volatile-sulfur-compound (VSC) solutions to eliminate gaseous VSCs by direct contact in a sealed space to describe possible mode of action of anti-VSC agents.

Materials and methods:
Twenty milliliters of each experimental solution, 0.16% sodium chlorite, 0.25% zinc chloride, 0.1% chlorhexidine and distilled water, was injected into a Teflon bag containing mixed VSCs, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide and mixed vigorously for 30 s. The VSC concentration was measured by gas chromatography before, immediately after, 30 min and 60 min after mixing.

Results:
The sodium chlorite solution reduced the VSC concentration remarkably. After mixing, nearly all VSCs were eliminated immediately and no VSCs were detected at 30 and 60 min post-mixing. However, in the other solutions, the VSC concentration decreased by ∼30% immediately after mixing and there was no further decrease.

Conclusion:
The results suggest that sodium chlorite solution has the effect of eliminating gaseous VSCs directly. This must be because it can release chlorine dioxide gas which can react directly with gaseous VSCs.



6. Herczegh A, Gyurkovics M, Agababyan H, Ghidán A, Lohinai Z. Comparing the efficacy of hyper-pure chlorine-dioxide with other oral antiseptics on oral pathogen microorganisms and biofilm in vitro. Acta Microbiol Immunol Hung. 2013 Sep;60(3):359-73. doi: 10.1556/AMicr.60.2013.3.10.

ABSTRACT

This study examines the antibacterial properties of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX), Listerine®, and high purity chlorine dioxide (Solumium, ClO2) on selected common oral pathogen microorganisms and on dental biofilm in vitro. Antimicrobial activity of oral antiseptics was compared to the gold standard phenol. We investigated Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Enterococcus faecalis, Veillonella alcalescens, Eikenella corrodens, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Candida albicans as some important representatives of the oral pathogens. Furthermore, we collected dental plaque from the upper first molars of healthy young students. Massive biofilm was formed in vitro and its reduction was measured after treating it with mouthrinses: CHX, Listerine® or hyper pure ClO2. Their biofilm disrupting effect was measured after dissolving the crystal violet stain from biofilm by photometer. The results have showed that hyper pure ClO2 solution is more effective than other currently used disinfectants in case of aerobic bacteria and Candida yeast. In case of anaerobes its efficiency is similar to CHX solution. The biofilm dissolving effect of hyper pure ClO2 is significantly stronger compared to CHX and Listerine® after 5 min treatment. In conclusion, hyper pure ClO2 has a potent disinfectant efficacy on oralpathogenic microorganisms and a powerful biofilm dissolving effect compared to the current antiseptics, therefore high purity ClO2 may be a new promising preventive and therapeutic adjuvant in home oral care and in dental or oral surgery practice.

7. Dr. Neetha J. Shetty; Dr. David . K; Dr. Kamala D. N; Dr. Ramya Shenoy Comparative study of a stabilized 0.1% chlorine dioxide with 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse in inhibiting the formation of volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) Indian Journal of Applied Research3(12):424 - 427 · December 2013

ABSTRACT

Background:
Research has been done previously on the oxidizing property and the clinical efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) on malodor. The aim of the present study was to compare the inhibitory effect of a mouthwash containing 0.1% ClO2 with 0.2% Chlorhexidine mouthwash on morning oral malodor.

Materials and methods:
A randomized, double blind, crossover trial was conducted among18 healthy male volunteers, who were divided into 2 groups. Group-1 subjects were instructed to rinse with the experimental mouthwash containing 0.1% ClO2 and group-2 subjects were asked to rinse with 0.2% chlorhexidine, twice per day for 7 days. After a one week washout period, each group then used the opposite mouthwash for 7 days. At baseline and after 7 days, oral malodor was evaluated with halimeter which measures Volatile Sulphur Compounds (VSCs) in parts per billion. The clinical variables that were measured included the plaque and gingival indices.

Results:
A decrease in the amount of VSCs was noted after a 7 day use of ClO2 as well as with the use of chlorhexidine mouthwash, which were statistically significant, with greater significance after the use of ClO2. Also, a significant reduction in plaque scores was noted after the use of test mouthwash. The decrease in the amount of VSCs indicates a reduction in oral malodor.
Future research is needed to examine the long-term effects, as well as effects of ClO2 on plaque accumulation and periodontal diseases in a well-defined sample of oral malodor patients and broader population samples.

Conclusion:
In this study, the results showed that a mouthwash containing ClO2 improved morning bad breath measured with the halimeter in healthy subjects. Also, ClO2 mouthwash used over a 7- day period was effective in reducing plaque accumulation. However, future studies are needed to examine more long-term effects of the mouthwash in halitosis patients and broader population samples.

8. Mohammad AR1, Giannini PJ, Preshaw PM, Alliger H. Clinical and microbiological efficacy of chlorine dioxide in the management of chronic atrophic candidiasis: an open study. Int Dent J. 2004 Jun;54(3):154-8.

ABSTRACT

Objective:
To assess the clinical and microbiological efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as a topical antiseptic for the treatment of chronic atrophic candidiasis in geriatric patients.

Participants:
Thirty patients with chronic atrophic candidiasis.

Methods:
Patients were instructed to rinse the mouth with 0.8% ClO2 mouth rinse (DioxiDent) twice daily for one minute and to soak their dentures overnight in the ClO2 for 10 days. Patients were evaluated both clinically and microbiologically at baseline and after 10 days, and any significant side effects were recorded. The clinical appearance of the oral soft tissues was scored on a scale of 0-3 (0 indicating no clinical signs, 1 indicating involvement of < 25% of the palatal mucosa, 2 indicating involvement of 25-50% of the palatal mucosa, and 3 indicating marked erythema involving > 50% of the palatal mucosa). Microbiological testing was undertaken to determine the number of colony forming units (CFUs) of Candida albicans.

Results:
ClO2 significantly improved the clinical appearance and microbial count (p < 0.001) after treatment, without significant side effects. Results showed marked improvement in the clinical appearance of the tissues after 10 days, with total resolution in the majority of cases. The total CFU/ml ranged from 15,000-53,000 at baseline and was reduced to < or = 500 after 10 days of treatment (p < 0.001). The mean clinical score was 2.50 at baseline, and was reduced to 0.17 after 10 days of treatment (p < 0.001).

Conclusions:
Within the limitations of this pilot study, the effectiveness of topical chlorine dioxide (0.8%) in the management of chronic atrophic candidiasis was demonstrated. ClO2 provided a safe and clinically effective option in the management of chronic atrophic candidiasis.

9. Drake D1, Villhauer AL. An in vitro comparative study determining bactericidal activity of stabilized chlorine dioxide and other oral rinses. J Clin Dent. 2011;22(1):1-5.

ABSTRACT

Objective:
The study was conducted to determine the bactericidal activity of a stabilized chlorine dioxide oral rinse (ClōSYS Oral Rinse) compared to products currently available on the market.

Methods:
Oral bacteria associated with gingivitis and periodontitis were exposed to rinses for one minute and five minutes. The numbers of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml) were measured prior to and following exposure to determine the bactericidal activity.

Results:
stabilized chlorine dioxide oral rinse (ClōSYS) and chlorhexidine rinses proved identical 100% kills against the periodontal pathogens at five minutes; in some cases, stabilized chlorine dioxide oral rinse (ClōSYS) oral rinse achieved a higher kill at the one-minute mark over the chlorhexidine rinse.

Conclusion:
The results demonstrated that stabilized chlorine dioxide oral rinse ClōSYS Oral Rinse has potential for providing a therapeutic benefit, making it an attractive option to induce compliance in patients concerned about taste and tooth discoloration during oral health therapy.

10. Yadav SR1, Kini VV2, Padhye A3. Inhibition of Tongue Coat and Dental Plaque Formation by Stabilized Chlorine Dioxide Vs Chlorhexidine Mouthrinse: A Randomized, Triple Blinded Study. J Clin Diagn Res. 2015 Sep;9(9):ZC69-74. doi: 10.7860/JCDR/2015/14587.6510. Epub 2015 Sep 1.

ABSTRACT

Background:
Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is an oxidizing agent with known bactericidal, viricidal and fungicidal properties. Its efficacy in reducing the halitosis has been established by previous literature. However, data evaluating its antiplaque property is scarce. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is considered as the gold standard and an effective adjunctive to mechanical plaque removal. However, it is associated with few reversible side effects. Therefore a study was conducted to assess the antiplaque property of ClO2 containing mouthrinse against CHX mouthrinse.

Materials and methods:
A Single Center, Randomized, Triple blinded, Microbiological clinical trial was conducted involving 25 healthy dental students volunteers (11 males, 14 females). Two commercially available mouthrinse: Mouthrinse A - Aqueous based ClO2 mouthrinse Freshchlor(®) and Mouthrinse B - Aqueous based 0.2% CHX mouthrinse Hexidine(®) were selected as the test products. Subjects were asked to rinse and gargle for 1 minute with the allocated mouthrinse under supervision after supragingival scaling, polishing and tongue coat removal. After four hours, smears were taken from the buccal mucosa and tooth surface. On the fifth day from baseline of four day non brushing plaque regrowth model the samples were again taken from buccal mucosa and tooth surface followed by recording of plaque scores by Rastogi Modification of Navy Plaque index, extent of tongue coat by Winkel's tongue coating index and measuring tongue coat wet weight in grams. The samples collected were subjected to microbial analysis and the results were expressed as colony forming units (CFUs) per sample.

Results:
The plaque scores and Winkels tongue coat scores, wet tongue coat weight recorded on the fifth day after the use of the two mouthrinse didn't show a statistically significant difference. The CFU per sample from tooth and mucosa after four hours revealed low bacteria count with respect to mouthrinse B however the CFU obtained on the fifth day did not show a statistically significant difference between the two mouthrinse.

Conclusion:
The clinical antiplaque efficacy of CHX and ClO2 mouthwash is comparable and so is the efficacy in reducing the oral bacterial load.

1. Shuichi Tsubura, Kimio Uchiyama, Manabu Yamada, Osamu Mimori, Shigeru Hiyama, Katsuma Katoh, Masaki Shibata. The Effect of Mouth Rinsing with Stabilized Chlorine Dioxide on Periodontitis. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2015, pp 20-24. http://pubs.sciepub.com/oral/3/1/5

2. Kayoko Shinada, Masayuki Ueno, Chisato Konishi, Sachiko Takehara, Sayaka Yokoyama, Takashi Zaitsu, Mari Ohnuki, Fredrick Allan Clive Wright and Yoko Kawaguchi; Effects of a mouthwash with chlorine dioxide on oral malodor and salivary bacteria: a randomized placebo-controlled 7-day trial. Trials. 2010 Feb 12;11:14. doi: 10.1186/1745-6215-11-14.

3. Frascella J1, Gilbert RD, Fernandez P, Hendler J. Effects of a mouthwash with chlorine dioxide on oral malodor and salivary bacteria: Compend Contin Educ Dent. 2000 Mar;21(3):241-4, 246, 248 passim; quiz 256.

4. Yeturu SK1, Acharya S2, Urala AS3, Pentapati KC4. Effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis: A randomized controlled trial. J Oral Biol Craniofac Res. 2016 Jan-Apr;6(1):54-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jobcr.2015.08.008. Epub 2015 Sep 11

5. Kim JS1, Park JW, Kim DJ, Kim YK, Lee JY. Direct effect of chlorine dioxide, zinc chloride and chlorhexidine solution on the gaseous volatile sulfur compounds. Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):645-50. doi: 10.3109/00016357. 2014. 887770. 

6. Herczegh A, Gyurkovics M, Agababyan H, Ghidán A, Lohinai Z. Comparing the efficacy of hyper-pure chlorine-dioxide with other oral antiseptics on oral pathogen microorganisms and biofilm in vitro. Acta Microbiol Immunol Hung. 2013 Sep;60(3):359-73. doi: 10.1556/AMicr.60.2013.3.10.

7. Dr. Neetha J. Shetty; Dr. David . K; Dr. Kamala D. N; Dr. Ramya Shenoy Comparative study of a stabilized 0.1% chlorine dioxide with 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse in inhibiting the formation of volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) Indian Journal of Applied Research3(12):424 - 427 · December 2013

8. Mohammad AR1, Giannini PJ, Preshaw PM, Alliger H. Clinical and microbiological efficacy of chlorine dioxide in the management of chronic atrophic candidiasis: an open study. Int Dent J. 2004 Jun;54(3):154-8.

9. Drake D1, Villhauer AL. An in vitro comparative study determining bactericidal activity of stabilized chlorine dioxide and other oral rinses. J Clin Dent. 2011;22(1):1-5.


10. Yadav SR1, Kini VV2, Padhye A3. Inhibition of Tongue Coat and Dental Plaque Formation by Stabilized Chlorine Dioxide Vs Chlorhexidine Mouthrinse: A Randomized, Triple Blinded Study. J Clin Diagn Res. 2015 Sep;9(9):ZC69-74. doi: 10.7860/JCDR/2015/14587.6510. Epub 2015 Sep 1.